The Short of It – The Teleported Man

The Teleported Man, a gritty black & white short film from Minnesota’s Tiny Coyote Productions.

The Teleported Man from Tiny Coyote Productions on Vimeo. Despite sporting the trappings of a micro budget film, The Teleported Man is rich in ideas and production design with the low-key lighting a particular standout for its ability to hammer home the film’s gritty techno-punk aesthetic.

The Teleported Man also borrows heavily from other similarly-themed works to good effect; the black & white over and under exposed look reminiscent of Pi (Darren Aronofksy), the music and lingering shots suggestive of Tarkovsky (Stalker, Solaris) with the Wachowski’s The Matrix an obvious influence.

Like many before it, this sci-fi films opens on a solitary character, alone in his workshop, tinkering away and obsessed with his inventions; nervous of any outside influence. We learn that our unknown character was once a successful technologist – who was on the front of Time Magazine no less – his success leading to an isolated existence.

His own pressure to reach a bar set high by past success weighs heavily – his willingness to try anything to fulfill his past achievements clouding his judgment, and making him wary of any real personal contact.

Ultimately he gets what he wants, but pays the price. Which raises an oft-posed question in science fiction: just because we have the creative thought, the technology and the knowhow, should we pursue it?

The Teleported Man seems to be trying to copy himself, or his consciousness, to the machine, a glowing white presences, which almost seems to inhabit the entire room, like our character himself is inside the machine.

With one of the best shots and moments of the film, something fails,or is sabotaged, and our hero is almost killed, painfully.

The transfer is complete, but and error is revealed. When he pulls himself away, separating himself, he confronts the machine and it kills him saying ‘You shouldn’t have woken up.’ – echoing in opposite ‘you shouldn’t have woken the machine up’.

We can delve deeper still and relate it to the human race becoming increasingly self conscious as we evolve – we shouldn’t have woken up – we shouldn’t have become so self aware and advanced that we gave birth to a life that may ultimately bring about our end.

The relation can also be made between God and man. God created man who evolved out of God, and began to stop believing (arguably), in a way destroying God – for what is God without belief and faith? The loop is then complete when man creates machine. It’s a bleak look at our possible future; one that I certainly don’t look forward to.

In my previous article I showed you Umbra, a strange and mystical tale about a creature and its shadow. Well Malcolm is at it again with Storm Jumper, ‘As a planetary storm approaches, a lone figure manages to avoid disaster.’ Enjoy the wonderful visuals and strange fantastical journey.

On a local note, a team of independent filmmakers (including myself) is in pre-production for a new science fiction short film called ‘Franky Fingers & The Apartment Upstairs’, and they need your support!

Franky Fingers is about a lost soul whose only peace is a harsh urban landscape. Check out the Pozible Page, send a ‘Like’ to our Facebook and help spread the word to get a local sci-fi short film made!

1 Comment on The Short of It – The Teleported Man

  1. Franky Fingers // May 30, 2014 at 6:24 pm // Reply

    Reblogged this on franky's short stories.

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  1. Saturday SF + F Link Action – “Judge a book by its cover” edition | Aurealis

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